Python 3K relased: world yawns

Filed under Software on December 7th, 2008

Unicode done right and some library restructuring.

Oh, and all classes are now proper classes.

Nothing to see here folks, move along…

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Coda release panic…

Filed under Intertubes, Software on May 8th, 2008

Panic’s Cabel writes on Coda’s mailing list, after someone asks when the next release is gonna be:

A company like Adobe, which has hundreds of engineers working on Photoshop, releases ONE version every two or three years, and maybe a single bug fix release in the interim. For the most part, we’re all cool with that, myself included! :)

But a shareware company that has, say, one or two people working on a product, is somehow expected to do releases every few months — even free major ones — or people start getting itchy.

Well, you don’t see people anxious for new releases of BBEdit or Transmit, even though those two programs are equally essential to many people’s workflow.

So it might have something to do with Coda missing some major features that should have been there from the beginning.

Like, say, multi-file search and replace.

P.S Oh, and people want new versions of Photoshop to happen more often tοo. Have we forgot the CS3 outcry?

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Geek template talk

Filed under Intertubes on May 3rd, 2008

When discussing hard science (e.g physics, chemistry, math etc) on a web forum or a comments thread, insert a random joke reference to the topic at hand —or a vaguely related one— to imply a deep understanding of science.

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Sweating the details…

Filed under Intertubes, Spotted on April 12th, 2008

A repost of the last posting, with some words crossed out and color-coded additions.

When I first saw it I thought mr. Gruber was giving us some sort of insight into his writing process.

Then I saw the exact same thing in some other feed and I realized it has nothing to do with mr. Gruber. It’s actually a feature of NetNewsWire, that highlights the changes in a newsfeed. A diff for rss, sort of.

Here is the before-and-after of one of his latest posts. Notice how improved the second version is, yet how subtle the changes —most of us would not have bothered. Sweating the details. That’s what it takes to become an A-list blogger —or an O.C.D patient.

Before:

Simply the best new movie I’ve seen in years. You can also save a few bucks and get the Cheapskate Edition instead.

One of Hitchcock’s gifts to cinema was the insight that the key to building suspense is to let the audience know something the characters do not. With its title alone, There Will Be Blood accomplishes this before the film even starts. There’s an ominous dread hanging over even seemingly innocuous scenes in the film that wouldn’t otherwise be there — or at least would be lessened — if the film were titled, say, Oil! (which was the name of the Upton Sinclair novel from which it was loosely adapted by Paul Thomas Anderson).

After:

Simply the best new movie I’ve seen in years. You can also save a few bucks and get the Cheapskate Edition instead.

One of Hitchcock’s gifts to cinema was the insight that the key to building suspense is to let the audience know something the characters do not. With its title alone, There Will Be Blood accomplishes this before the film even starts. There’s an ominous dread hanging over even seemingly innocuous scenes that wouldn’t be there if the film were titled, say, Oil! (which was the name of the Upton Sinclair novel from which it was loosely adapted by Paul Thomas Anderson).

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Speaking out of one own’s behind: Michael Arrington

Filed under Intertubes on April 9th, 2008

Can you believe this thread?

Some Google employess released a blatant (semi-endorsed by Google) rip-off of 37 Signals’ Campfire.

When people all around the Intertubes complained, Google took it down.

Michael Arrington comments on TechCrunch:

Google showcased HuddleChat, a real-time chat application, as one of many test applications (directory here) to show off their new Google App Engine platform last night.

Some bloggers noted that the application was a rip off of Campfire, a 37Signals product. And 37Signals CEO Jason Fried used HuddleChat as a PR opportunity, telling ReadWriteWeb “We’re flattered Google thinks Campfire is a great product, we’re just disappointed that they stooped so low to basically copy it feature for feature, layout for layout…We thought that would be beneath Google, but maybe its time to reevaluate what they stand for.”

So, Google can rip-off his company’s product, but when Jason complains he uses the rip-off as a “PR opportunity”? That’s beyond double standards.

Frankly, the reaction is fairly ridiculous. But this is apparently a fight that Google doesn’t want to be involved in. They pulled the application and replaced it with the above notice.

Ridiculous, why exactly? Because mr. Arrington does not make any money out of Campfire? Because it is OK to rip-off a user interface verbatim?

Would mr. Arrington complain if someone copies his article word for word -maybe with some adjectives changed? Or if Google launched a TechCrunch clone, with the same layout done in blue?

I wonder if Darren Delaye, Braden Kowitz, and Kyle Consalus, the Google developers who created HuddleChat, had much of a say in the decision. And why, since HuddleChat is not an official Google product, was it Google that made the decision to pull it down and not the developers who created it? Google was very careful to say that they were not affiliated with HuddleChat while it was up – that, apparently, wasn’t the case.

Obviously that wasn’t the case, just a lame excuse used by Google. To begin with, according to the law, code by Google employees belongs to Google. Furthemore, this was not a code submission by some independent developer, or a Google guy in his spare time. It was done as an inside project, and released to showcase Google’s new application platform.

As far as I’m concerned, this is the first case of censorship on the new Google App Engine platform, and a bad precedent.

Why? Are there any other web application platform vendors that gladly host rip-offs on their platforms? Would Amazon host a widget-by-widget and form-by-form rip-off of Flickr on AWS, for example, or would they take it down?

Our test application for Google App Engine is here.

See if we care.

The rest of the comments are just as hilarious.

Some argue that “all chat clients have to look more or less the same”. E, no, they don’t. Adium, MSN, Yahoo Messenger, Skype!, GTalk, all are quite different beasts from a GUI perspective. If I was to release a widget perfect rip-off of any of these, with a different color scheme, people would call me a thief. For good reason.

Others complain about the whining done by 37 Signals on the matter. Without noticing that 37 Signals has not done any. It was third party bloggers, journalists and users complained about HuddleChat.

Other’s still, green with jealousy, complain about 37 Signals and it’s founders. They are “arrogant”, they say, and they had “enough of them”, etc. Like it has anything to do with the case at hand.

Against Intertube’s crowds, god’s themselves contend in vain.

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